Saturday, February 23, 2013

The elusive Marriage Certificate


Internal photoBuilt: 1827 - 29
Architect: James Savage
Listing: grade 2

So many Mary Ann's in the era of my Welsh great grandmother - its difficult to trace the record of just one - my bloodline....
With the help of Shirley my Welsh based genealogist, we have tracked down the correct Marriage certificate of Mary Ann Evans to George Robinson in September 1862.
The certificate reveals the names of the parents of the married couple and leads me on to identifying the lineage and history for Mary Ann. To paint a picture of her childhood in Haverfordwest I will research for historical documents, records, journals and events for the 1830's to 1860's in Pembrokeshire.

I was interested in which church they were married in and searched for the All Saints Church in Sanderstead, Croydon, UK to get a picture and the history of the church.


Details of Church

The church of All Saints was built in 1827-29 to the designs of James Savage, and originally served as a Chapel of Ease to Croydon Parish Church. The tower and spire were added in 1841 and the chancel in 1861. The church was severely damaged by bombing during the Second World War and was restored in 1954. The restoration included the removal of the north and south galleries, the conversion of the south porch into a baptistry and the replacement of the east windows in the chancel and Lady Chapel.

Mary Ann gave birth to her first son, George, in 1862 - and given that the marriage took place in September that year - I am guessing that Mary was already pregnant at the time of the marriage; not uncommon in those days or these days for that matter. Mary Ann's first born, my grand uncle, continued the Welsh tradition and married a girl from Merthyr Tidfil, Glamorganshire. Their marriage took place in St Saviour's Church, Surrey, England.

Mary Ann's earlier life, in the 1850's includes her service to John and Eliza Rees, owners of a 345 acre property as a domestic servant. (that is of course, if this the same Mary Ann Evans.) According to Wikipedia, domestic workers perform a variety of household services for an individual or a family, from providing care for children and elderly dependents to cleaning and household maintenance, known as housekeeping. Responsibilities may also include cooking, doing laundry and ironing, food shopping and other household errands. Some domestic workers live within the household where they work.

This research has led me to the Welsh Journals Online and I am now happily delving into the historical facts of Haverfordwest. So there will be more on the life of my Welsh great grandmother in later posts.

Marriage for Lettice Day and David Evans


Now looking back into time from great grandmother Mary Ann Evans, I am now on the trail of her father, David Evans who married Lettice Day my second great Welsh grandmother.
I am sure that there will be many David Evans' recorded in the Wales census and indexes, so I will focus on Lettice - whose unusual name may be easier to trace.

Lettice was born in 1810 in Pembrokeshire and at the time of the 1841 Welsh census was living with David Evans, her husband, and their four children: Mary aged 10; George jnr aged 7; John aged 3 and Richard aged 1. Given these facts I can see that Lettice was only 21 when she gave birth to Mary Ann. I wondered when she was married to David so I searched the National Archives for her and found that she was married on the 1st July 1828, when she was just 18 years old. This same search revealed that the Banns for this marriage were read out on 15 June at Haverfordwest, St Mary, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

Now I can take that information and present it to Shirley who may be able to find the actual marriage records in the Parish for that year. We could then send for a copy of that certificate or possibly take a digital image of the Parish register to verify her parents' and David's parents identity. So far, from research at Ancestry.com, I have David's birth as 1807 in Sutton, Haverfordwest.

Whilst that is being done I can work on the research for life in the early 1810's in Pembrokeshire and look for historical events of significance that would have shaped the lives of my great, great Welsh grandparents - Lettice and David.